University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Social Work Clinical Lecture Series

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When:    
February 12, 2019 12-2pm, Tuesday

Where:
UNC Chapel Hill School of Social Work Auditorium, 325 Pittsboro St, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Directions and Parking
**LIVE STREAMING AVAILABLE**

Continuing Education:
2 Hours (details)

Fees:
$35.00

**Current UNC-SSW students, staff, faculty, field instructors, and task supervisors**
Fee Waived

Description:
This presentation is designed to introduce care providers for those with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities to trauma informed care. Research indicates that individuals with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities are at heightened risk for traumatic histories. Additionally, there are factors specific to intellectual and/or developmental disabilities that make identification and treatment of such issues difficult. With national attention and accolades for trauma informed approaches for the general population, it is important to begin to understand and apply this framework to services for this population.
Andrea Winkler, MSW, LCSW, LCAS has emerged in the last seven years as an engaging and informative practice-based trainer. She maintains a full-time caseload at the Duke Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic where she provides mental health assessment and brief psychotherapy. Her passion for trauma and gender related issues began early in her academic experience at James Madison University, and continued throughout her MSW program at UNC Chapel Hill. Completion of UNC’s Certificate in Substance Abuse Studies provided additional specialization in a population for whom trauma is a primary co-occurring feature. Andrea has developed and led trainings that support the practical application of trauma informed care into the medical, educational, intellectual/developmental disabilities, mental health, and substance use treatment fields.

Trainer:

Andrea Winkler, MSW, LCSW, LCAS has emerged in the last seven years as an engaging and informative practice-based trainer. She maintains a full-time caseload at the Duke Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic where she provides mental health assessment and brief psychotherapy. Her passion for trauma and gender related issues began early in her academic experience at James Madison University, and continued throughout her MSW program at UNC Chapel Hill. Completion of UNC’s Certificate in Substance Abuse Studies provided additional specialization in a population for whom trauma is a primary co-occurring feature. Andrea has developed and led trainings that support the practical application of trauma informed care into the medical, educational, intellectual/developmental disabilities, mental health, and substance use treatment fields.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to list events that may contribute to a traumatic sequelae for individuals with I/DD.
  2. Participants will be able to explain some of the ways that intellectual or developmental disabilities may mediate the symptoms of PTSD.
  3. Participants will be able to describe at least two potential applications of trauma-informed care in their role with the intellectually/developmentally disabled adults.

References:

  • Focht-New, G., Barol, B., Clements, P., & Milliken, T. (2008). Persons with developmental disability exposed to interpersonal violence and crime: Strategies and guidance for assessment. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 44(1), 3-13.
  • Focht-New, G., Barol, B., Clements, P., & Milliken, T. (2008). Persons with developmental disability exposed to interpersonal violence and crime: Approaches for intervention. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 44(2), 89-98.
  • Keesler, J. (2014). A call for the integration of trauma-informed care among intellectual and developmental disability organizations. Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 11(1), 34-42.
  • Keesler, J. (2016). Trauma-informed day services for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities: Exploring staff understanding and perception within an innovative program. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, (29), 481-492.
  • Mevissen, L. & de Jongh, A. (2010). PTSD and its treatment in people with intellectual disabilities: A review of the literature. Clinical Psychology Review, (30), 308316.