Ethics of Self-Determination: Empowering Older Adults to Make Their Own Life Decisions

Monday, March 24, 2014Tanya Richmond_photoIn this workshop, Tanya Richmond will address ethical issues involved in promoting self-determination among older adults, particularly in regard to end-of-life decisions. Issues of individual autonomy versus a legal stance of “protection” and the legal parameters of capacity will also be highlighted. This will include considerations of cognitive functioning, legal documents, and family dynamics, and the realities of limited systemic resources and increased demand for legal substituted judgment. Ms. Richmond will focus on the use of person-centered planning to help clinicians in decision making support roles to work ethically with clients who are facing challenging decisions in their later years.Bio: Tanya Richmond, MSW, LCSW is a program coordinator and assistant clinical professor of social work at the Center for Aging Research and Educational Services (CARES) in the Jordan Institute for Families at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is committed to advocating for vulnerable populations, and works as a liaison to the State and county legal systems to improve the quality of life for older and disabled individuals. She is a very active trainer on effective care for geriatric populations and families with special needs, and has also taught direct practice courses for MSW students. Her experience in direct practice includes work with individuals, families, and groups, and is a certified bilingual practitioner for the deaf, rape crisis counselor, and tai chi instructor.SLIDES | printable Handouts