(De)Constructing Emotional Experience

How Emotions are Made,
with Lisa Feldman Barrett, Ph.D.

co-sponsored by UNC Department of Psychology

When: Friday, February 2, 2018, 12:00 – 2:00 (arrive at 11:30 a.m. to sign in and for “meet and greet” reception catered by Vimala’s CurryBlossom Cafe)

Where: Auditorium, UNC Chapel Hill School of Social Work, at 325 Pittsboro St, Chapel Hill, NC.

Fees: Free to General Public;
$35 for CE Workshop (includes credit for LCSWs, NBCCs, and category A)

Registration:   click here

Live Streaming: Can’t make it in person? Participate through live stream. Those who register for live streaming will receive an email with directions on how to join via Zoom  before the lecture.

Description:

In this presentation, Lisa Feldman Barrett will describe her cutting-edge research on how emotions are constructed in the moment by core systems that interact across the whole brain, rather than being fixed, universal categories. She will also elaborate on the significant implications for psychotherapeutic work, and explain how and why psychotherapy can help transform people’s emotional experiences.

Trainer:

Lisa Feldman Barrett, Ph.D., is a University Distinguished Professor of Psychology at Northeastern University, with appointments at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital. She has published more than 200 peer-reviewed articles on emotions and neuroscience as well as the popular book, How Emotions are Made: The Secret Life of the Brain (2017). She has received numerous awards for her work, including the National Institutes of Health Director’s Pioneer Award and election to the Royal Society of Canada.

Learning Objectives:

At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe at least 1 instance that demonstrates how emotions are constructed rather than universal.
  2. Identify at least 2 practices that can help people to change their experience with emotions.
  3. Explain at least 1 reason that the practice of labeling one’s experience of emotions can lead to a transformative experience.

References:

  • Barrett, L. F. (2012). Emotions are real. Emotion, 12 (3) 413-429.
  • Barrett, L. (2017). The theory of constructed emotion: An active inference account of interoception and categorization. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 12(1), 1-23.
  • Barrett, L. F., & Simmons, W. K. (2015). Interoceptive predictions in the brain. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 16(7), 419-429.

Information on Continuing Education:

2 hours of CE will be awarded by UNC School of Social Work:

  • Contact Hours ASWB UNC School of Social Work, #1406, is approved as a provider for social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards(ASWB) www.aswb.org through the Approved Continuing Education (ACE) Program.  UNC School of Social Work maintains responsibility for the program.  ASWB Approval Period: 8/10/16 to 8/10/19.  Social Workers should contact their regulatory board to determine course approval for continuing education hours.  Social Workers participating in this intermediate course will receive 2 continuing education contact hours (ASWB).
  • 2 Contact Hours NBCC (provider #6642) The UNC School of Social Work is an NBCC-Approved Continuing Education Provider (ACEPTM) and may offer NBCC-approved clock hours for events that meet NBCC requirements. The ACEP solely is responsible for all aspects of the program.
  • Each clinical lecture is co-sponsored by the North Carolina Psychological Association and the UNC School of Social Work. The North Carolina Psychological Association is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The North Carolina Psychological Association maintains responsibility for this program and its content. Each workshop is offered for 2 Hours of continuing education.

References:

  • Barrett, L. F. (2012). Emotions are real. Emotion, 12 (3) 413-429.
  • Barrett, L. (2017). The theory of constructed emotion: An active inference account of interoception and categorization. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 12(1), 1-23.
  • Barrett, L. F., & Simmons, W. K. (2015). Interoceptive predictions in the brain. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 16(7), 419-429.

Transportation/ Directions: The most reliable place to park is in the UNC Hospital lot on Manning Drive. Parking fee is $1.50/ hour. The Carolina Inn next door on Pittsboro has space-available pay parking for a flat fee of $20/day. There are also numerous “park & ride” locations in Chapel Hill, with bus service to (or near) the School of Social Work. Directions.

Attendance Policy: To receive CE’s, you must be present for the entire session, and you must sign the sign-in and sign-out sheets (for psychologists). No partial CE’s will be given. No CE’s will be given to participants who are more than 15 minutes late at the beginning of any session. No CE’s will be given to participants who leave before the close of a session.

ADA Statement: If you require any of the auxiliary aids or services identified in the Americans with Disabilities Act in order to participate in this program, please call us at 919-962-6540 no later than ten business days before the program.

Payment and refund policies: There will be no refunds issued, however you may transfer your place to a colleague or receive credit for future lectures. Please contact Carol Ann Hincy at chincy@email.unc.edu or 919-962-6540 to make arrangements, or if you have any other questions.

How to access UNC wireless: click here for instructions 

REGISTER HERE

Additional questions? Contact Deborah Barrett, PhD, LCSW at dbarrett@unc.edu or 919-843-5818 or Carol Ann Hincy at chincy@email.unc.edu or 919-962-6540.