Spirituality as a Cultural Competency Practice with Tonya Armstrong

“Are You There, God? It’s Me and My Therapist”: Spirituality as Culturally Competent Practice, presented by Tonya Armstrong, Ph.D., M.T.S || printable Handouts || SLIDES || Bibliography


TonyaWhen
Monday, March 2, 2015, 12-2 pm, at the Tate-Turner-Kuralt Auditorium of the UNC School of Social Work, Chapel Hill, NC  with catered meet-and-greet reception at 11:15 am catered by Vimala’s CurryBlossom Café)

Where: UNC School of Social Work, 325 Pittsboro Street, Chapel Hill, NC   Directions and parking

Tate-Turner-Kuralt Auditorium of the UNC School of Social Work, Chapel Hill, NC

CEUs2 hours

 

Description: Mental health professionals in the 21st century are more and more likely to encounter clients who desire the integration of spirituality into their therapeutic care.  Indeed, our ethical obligation to demonstrate cultural competence extends into the arena of spirituality.  While contemporary training programs are increasingly adept at preparing students to navigate spiritual topics, many otherwise well-trained clinicians seek guidance in appreciating broad spiritual traditions and integrating spirituality competently.  Furthermore, for students and seasoned therapists alike, there exists a dearth of clinical, supervisory, and consultative opportunities to grapple with this ethereal subject using concrete strategies. This presentation will provide an overview of approaches for the conceptualization, assessment, and integration of spirituality into mental health and wellness care. Through a combination of didactic material, case studies, and experiential exercises, participants will learn integrative practices that can be applied in clinical settings.

Tonya Armstrong, Ph.D., M.T.S., a licensed psychologist, is the founder and CEO of The Armstrong Center for Hope, a private group practice of multi-disciplinary mental health professionals cultivating psychological and spiritual wellness for all ages. She has produced scholarship in the areas of spirituality, African-American mental health, end-of-life care, and grief.  Currently, she serves as the Dean of the Master of Arts in Christian Counseling program at the Apex School of Theology in Durham, NC and has served for the last 15 years as the Minister of Congregational Care and Counseling at Union Baptist Church in Durham, NC, where she helps oversee Stephen Ministry, grief support groups, and counseling and psychotherapy practice by licensed mental health professionals. Her previous experience includes serving as Pastoral Theologian at the Institute on Care at the End of Life at Duke Divinity School, as well as clinical and consulting experience in a variety of inpatient and outpatient settings. Throughout her work, Dr. Armstrong seeks the faithful integration of theology and mental health care.

CEUs: 2 clock hours (.2 CEUs)

The UNC School of Social Work is an NBCC-Approved Continuing Education Provider (ACEPTM) and may offer NBCC-approved clock hours for events that meet NBCC requirements. The ACEP solely is responsible for all aspects of the program.  

Learning Objectives:

At the completion of this program, participants will be able to

  1.  Compare and contrast three different conceptualizations of spirituality
  2. Recognize at least four approaches to the assessment of client spirituality
  3. Practice five concrete strategies for integrating spiritual practice into mental health and wellness care

CEU:

Contact hours provided for LCSWs and LMFTs 2 hours

National Board for Certified Counselors Credit (NBCC) 2 hours

The UNC School of Social Work is an NBCC-Approved Continuing Education Provider (ACEPTM) and  may offer NBCC-approved clock hours for events that meet NBCC requirements. The ACEP solely is responsible for all aspects of the program.  Two Contact Hours per event No partial credit will be given. Participants must attend the entire program in order to receive credit.

The program is co-sponsored by the North Carolina Psychological Association and the UNC School of Social Work. The North Carolina Psychological Association is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The North Carolina Psychological Association maintains responsibility for this program and its content. This program is offered for 2 hours of continuing education credit.

 ATTENDANCE POLICY for Category A – To receive credit, you must be present for the entire session, and you must sign the sign-in and sign-out sheets. No credit will be given to participants who are more than 15 minutes late at the beginning of any session. No credit will be given to participants who leave before the close of a session. 

 

Some resources:

  1. Jacobs, C. (2010).  Exploring religion and spirituality in clinical practice.  Smith College Studies in Social Work, 80, 98-120.
  2. Plante, T. G. (2014).  Four steps to improve religious/spiritual cultural competence in professional psychology.  Spirituality in Clinical Practice, 1, 288-292.
  3. Sperry, L. (2014).  Effective spiritually oriented psychotherapy practice is culturally sensitive practice.  Spirituality in Clinical Practice, 1, 245-247.
  4. Sperry, L., & Shafranske, E. P. (Eds.). (2005).  Spiritually oriented psychotherapy.  Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
  5. Wilson, K. G. (with Dufrene, T.). (2008).  Mindfulness for two: An acceptance and commitment therapy approach to mindfulness in psychotherapy.  Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, Inc.